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Yes, baseball season has finally started. And many of us gluttons for punishment will now have a new source for our daily dose of pain. For me personally, the preferred sources of pain are the (mis)fortunes of the Dallas Mavericks and Dallas Cowboys. They generally keep me well supplied from September to around June or a Mavs play-off exit (whichever comes first) each year. However, after the Mavs season ends and before the Cowboys season begins, there is a certain emptiness in my life each year. I have considered diversifying my couch potato portfolio of pain by subscribing to the miseries of the Texas Rangers, but it is too radical a lifestyle change for me to make all of a sudden.

But perhaps I digress, my friends.

“When my children grow up, I want them to be…”

Thus begins the Coda in Marshall Goldsmith’s new book – Mojo. This is the question Marshall asked thousands of parents across the world. They could only respond in one word. What do you think it was?

Tweak the question…

“I want all my loved ones to be…”

How would you answer it?

Last month, I attended a conference call on Marshall Goldsmith’s new book – Mojo, and decided I just had to read it! Last week I finished reading the book and wanted to share some of his inspiring thoughts with you.

Marshal defines Mojo as the state of an individual or an organization in which everything goes right and one success leads to another, kind of like being in the zone. Nojo, on the other hand, is the exact opposite – a state where there is boredom, frustration and misery. Life is too short for us to have Nojo in our Dojo 🙂 Mojo provides simple tools and techniques to measure and boost our Mojo on a daily basis.

One of the most touching chapters in the book is the one on Daily Questions…

So what does all this mean?

* Is there a reason behind the differences in the way we respond to situations or do we do it just to * irritate each other?
* Is there a way for us to understand our preferred responses and adjust them if our natural first response hurts us?
* How can we understand, appreciate and capitalize on our differences instead of allowing them to obstruct our progress?

Quite like the hand we prefer to use for writing, we are all born with certain innate preferences for interacting with the world, processing information, making decisions and implementing our ideas. These preferences influence the situations in which we feel natural, relaxed and confident, and those in which we feel uncomfortable, awkward and strained.